OLD SCHOOL HIP-HOP 1993

  • Casual - "Thoughts of The Thoughtful" (2.57)
    Jon Owens (born December 19, 1975), known by his stage name Casual, is an American rapper from Oakland, California and one of the founding members of the alternative hip hop collective Hieroglyphics. After his debut album Fear Itself garnered both critical and commercial success, Casual went on to become one of the most prominent and recognizable faces on the Hieroglyphics roster, releasing five full-length LPs over the span of his twenty-year career. Despite the lackluster sales of the LPs following his debut, which were preceded by an absence of both critical and popular acclaim, Owens has garnered a following amongst devoted hip hop fans, particularly in the Bay Area hip hop scene, largely due to his specialization in hardcore battle rhymes.

    Casual ‎– "That's How It Is"
    Label:
    Jive ‎– 01241-42130-1
    Format:
    Vinyl, 12"
    Country:
    US
    Released:
    1993
    Genre:
    Hip Hop
    Style:

    Tracklist
    A1 That's How It Is (LP Version) 3:07
    A2 That's How It Is (Disseshowedo Mix)
    Remix – Casual
    3:40
    B1 That's How It Is (A Cappella) 2:40
    B2 Thoughts Of The Thoughtful (LP Version)
    Producer – Domino (3)
    2:56
    B3 That's How It Is (LP Instrumental) 3:07
    Credits
    Producer – Del Tha Funkee Homosapien (tracks: A1, A2, B3)

    "Fear Itself"

    Studio album by Casual
    Released February 1, 1994
    Recorded July 1992 - February 1993
    Genre Hip hop, West Coast hip hop
    Length 49:21
    Label Jive
    Producer Casual, Del tha Funkee Homosapien, Domino, Jay Biz
    Casual chronology
    Fear Itself
    (1994) Meanwhile...
    (1997)
    Singles from Fear Itself
    "That's How It Is"
    Released: August 6, 1993
    "I Didn't Mean To"
    Released: January 17, 1994
    "Me-O-Mi-O"
    Released: May 2, 1994
    "Fear Itself" is the debut studio album from American hip hop artist Casual, released February 1, 1994 on Jive Records.

    The album peaked at number 108 on the Billboard 200 chart.

    Contents [show]
    Release and reception[edit]
    Professional ratings
    Review scores
    Source Rating
    Allmusic 4/5 stars[1]
    Chris Witt of Allmusic commended Casual for his lyrical abilities, noting how the MC "produces an unending and seemingly unstoppable flow of boasts and taunts," and also remarking that "the simplicity of his message belies the complexity of his vicious wordplay."[1]

    Track listing[edit]
    All music by J. Owens and D. Siguenza except where noted.

    No. Title Music Sample(s)[2] Length
    1. "Intro"
    "The Breakdown Pt. I & II" by Rufus Thomas
    "Shining Symbol" by Roy Ayers Ubiquity
    1:42
    2. "You Flunked" Owens
    "Cold Duck Time" by Eddie Harris & Les McCann
    3:14
    3. "Me-O-Mi-O"
    "Big Sur Suite" by Johnny "Hammond" Smith
    "Rural Still Life #26" by Tom Scott
    4:06
    4. "Get Off It" Owens
    "Fire & Rain" by Philip Upchurch
    "Mr. Clean" by Freddie Hubbard
    "Straight Life" by Freddie Hubbard
    3:14
    5. "That's How It Is" Jones, Owens 2:57
    6. "That Bulls**t" (feat. Saafir) Owens 1:46
    7. "Follow the Funk"
    "Hard Times" by Curtis Mayfield
    "River's Invitation" by Freddie Robinson
    3:55
    8. "Who's It On" (feat. Del tha Funkee Homosapien and Pep Love) Jones, Owens, Peacock, Siguenza
    "Tragic Magic" by Nathan Davis
    3:56
    9. "I Didn't Mean To" Owens
    "Blowin' with the Wind" by Kool & the Gang
    3:39
    10. "We Got It Like That" 3:11
    11. "A Little Something" (feat. Del tha Funkee Homosapien) Jones, Owens 1:21
    12. "This Is How We Rip S**t" Owens, Suarez 3:36
    13. "Lose in the End"
    "Believe It or Not (Kojak Theme)" by Black Heat
    "Chicken Heads" by Black Heat
    3:45
    14. "Thoughts of the Thoughtful"
    "Brawling Broads" by Roy Ayers Ubiquity
    "Celestial Blues" by Gary Bartz
    2:56
    15. "Chained Minds" Owens 3:05
    16. "Be Thousand" 2:58
    Chart history[edit]
    Album[edit]
    Chart (1994)[3] Peak
    position
    U.S. Billboard 200 108
    U.S. R&B Albums 22
    Singles[edit]
    Year Single Peak chart positions[4]
    U.S. Hot Dance Music/Maxi-Singles Sales U.S. Hot Rap Singles
    1993 "That's How It Is" — 22
    1994 "I Didn't Mean To" 29 34
    "Me-O-Mi-O" 50 —
    Personnel[edit]
    Information taken from Allmusic.[5]

    engineering – Matt Kelley
    mastering – Tom Coyne
    mixing – Casual, Chris Trevett
    photography – Michael Lucero
    production – Casual, Del tha Funkee Homosapien, Domino, Jay Biz
    scratching – Touré
    vocals – A+, Del tha Funkee Homosapien, Extra Prolific, Pep Love, Phesto, Souls of Mischief, Tajai
  • Del Tha Funkee Homosapien - "Miles To Go" (3.02)
    "No Need For Alarm"

    Studio album by Del the Funky Homosapien
    Released November 23, 1993
    Recorded 1992-1993 at Hyde Street Studios, San Francisco, CA
    Genre Hip hop
    Alternative hip hop
    Golden age hip hop
    Funk
    Length 53:51
    Label Elektra
    Producer Del, Snupe, Casual, Domino, SD50's, Jay-Biz, A-Plus
    Del the Funky Homosapien chronology
    I Wish My Brother George Was Here
    (1991) No Need For Alarm
    (1993) Future Development
    (1997)
    Professional ratings
    Review scores
    Source Rating
    Allmusic 3/5 stars [1]
    Entertainment Weekly A−[2]
    "No Need for Alarm" is the second studio album by hip hop artist Del the Funky Homosapien. It was released on November 23, 1993 on Elektra Records. It was a complete departure from his G-Funk influenced first album and without the assistance of his older cousin, Ice Cube. Primarily produced by Del and the rest of his hip hop collective Hieroglyphics. No Need For Alarm would be one of three classic "Hiero Golden Age" albums the collective would release to critical acclaim (including Souls of Mischief's 93 'til Infinity and Casual's Fear Itself).

    Contents [show]
    Track listing[edit]
    # Title Producer(s) Performer(s) Sample(s)
    1 "You're In Shambles" Snupe *"Prelude I" by John Klemmer
    *"Ya Lil' Crumbsnatchers" by Del tha Funkee Homosapien
    *"No Trespass" by Chubb Rock
    2 "Catch A Bad One" Casual *"Rhapsody In Blue" by Deodato
    *"Mrs. Parker of K.C.(Bird's Mother)" by Eric Dolphy
    3 "Wack M.C.'s" Del
    4 "No Need for Alarm" Domino *"Don't Change Your Love" by Five Stairsteps
    *"Flat Backing" by Blue Mitchell
    5 "Boo Booheads" SD50's
    Intro: Kurious
    *"Is It Him or Me" by Jackie Jackson
    *"Waves" by Jeremy Steig
    6 "Treats for the Kiddies" SD50's *"Destiny's Children" by Freddie Hubbard
    7 "Worldwide" Casual
    First verse: Del
    Second verse: Unicron
    *"Sing A Simple Song" by Sly & The Family Stone
    8 "No More Worries" Domino
    First verse: A-Plus
    Second verse: Casual
    Third verse: Del
    Fourth verse: Snupe
    *"Oh! Oh! Here He Comes" by Herbie Hancock
    *"Part III" by Jerry Butler
    9 "Wrong Place" Del *"What Do You Do In The Dark" by B.T. Express
    10 "In and Out" Del *"I'm Chief Kamanawanalea (We're the Royal Macadamia Nuts)" by The Turtles
    11 "Don't Forget" Domino *"Fire Eater" by Rusty Bryant
    *"Tranquility" by Sam Rivers
    *"(Don't Worry) If There's a Hell Below, We're All Going to Go" by Curtis Mayfield
    12 "Miles To Go" Jay-Biz
    13 "Check It Ooout" Del *"Sport" by Lightnin' Rod
    14 "Thank Youse" A-Plus *"Catch A Groove" by Juice
    *"Hallucinate" by The Crusaders
  • HOUSE OF PAIN - "TOP O THE MORNING TO YA" ( UNDERDOG MIX ) RARE (4.34)
    House of Pain is an American hip hop group who released three albums in the 1990s before lead rapper Everlast left to pursue his solo career. The group's name is a reference to the H.G. Wells novel The Island of Dr. Moreau, a reference carried further by the naming of their 2011 tour "He Who Breaks the Law". The group is best known for its 1992 hit single "Jump Around", which reached No. 3 in the United States, No. 6 in Ireland and No. 8 in the United Kingdom. The group broke up in 1996 but reformed in 2010, after the trio had been members of supergroup La Coka Nostra for several years.

    House Of Pain ‎– "Top O' The Morning To Ya (Remix) / Jump Around"
    Label:
    XL Recordings ‎– XLT 43
    Format:
    Vinyl, 12", 33 ⅓ RPM
    Country:
    UK
    Released:
    May 1993
    Genre:
    Hip Hop
    Style:

    Tracklist.
    Drinking Side
    A1 Top O' The Morning To Ya (Remix)
    Remix – Underdog, The*
    3:48
    A2 Top O' The Morning To Ya (Original Mix) 3:37
    Fighting Side
    B1 Jump Around (Original Mix) 3:37
    B2 Jump Around (Pete Rock Remix)
    Remix – Pete Rock
    3:56
    Companies etc
    Phonographic Copyright (p) – Tommy Boy Records
    Copyright (c) – XL Recordings
    Distributed By – Warner Music UK Ltd.
    Notes
    Sticker on cover reads: 'Includes FREE Colour Poster'.
  • Onyx - "Atak Of Da Bal-Hedz" (3.13)
    Offical Onyx Lyrics:

    Sticky Fingaz:
    What's the matter with my brain?
    I can't think clear, oh it's the hair
    Run and get the razor gotta make it disappear
    There, now I got an open mind, plus some grease to give it shine

    Fredro:
    Bald heads and hoodies, black jeans and boots scuffed
    Move by the millions and children stay rough for the
    one for the road, sell outs get wetted
    Wild to rip and conflicts get deaded
    Gats and backwards baseball caps
    When I react I set traps, no haps they get jacked

    Chorus:
    It's attack of the bald heads, attack of the bald heads, attack of the bald heads
    Attack of the bald heads, attack of the bald heads

    Sonsee:
    Most times I get dirty, down low
    Scandalous, crazy conniving, wild, suckers know I'll smoke em like the bloody buddah
    Bless bald head style, triple zero against ya grain I shaved em close and nicked em
    Cause it's just another victim

    Sticky Fingaz:
    Shhh, what, what's up? Listen do you hear what I hear? Yeah
    Sounds like an intruder comin in the rear
    Come on Sticky, sick em, nah I wanna kick em
    I got the glock cocked I'm with it, now they gonna get it

    Big DS:
    I got 'em, I shot 'em, he hit rock bottom
    I flip it, get wicked and wild when I spot em
    DS knows best, yep I pack a heater
    Twenty bags of cheeba, slow up ya damn speeder
    We rush on em hard, bring em out dead
    Onyx rush on em hard, bring em out dead
    Bald heads rush on em hard, bring em out dead
    Stinkin, what the hell was they thinkin...the bald heads

    Chorus:
    Attack of the bald heads; attack, attack
    Attack of the bald heads; attack, attack
    Attack of the bald heads, attack of the bald heads
    Bald heads, attack

    Fredro:
    I got news now, for crews no way no how
    So give it away give it away give it away now
    Smooth as a baby's ass, headed for the body blast buddy
    Escaping through the ghetto, kicks muddy
    Wilder than Wolverine, run with the scheme team, meaner than Mean Gene
    Obscene and heads clean, so well aware, farewell
    There goes the big bell, and that means see ya hate to be ya

    Sonsee:
    My clean bean production, so damn disgusting
    In the cut bust ya gut and head bustin
    Ain't no escapin the madface invasion
    Hot ice and cold steel pressin up in your grill
    Word to God I get odd, and even
    leave a punk dead out
    Slice up the scalp, man I'll leave ya head in shreds
    Attack of the bald heads, attack of the bald heads

    Sticky Fingaz:
    Ay yo what's goin on with the world?
    Yesterday I seen a bald head girl
    What? Move, you heard what I said
    I wouldn't be caught dead without a bald head
    Make one false move and I'ma fill ya with lead
    Cause it's enough dum-dum bullets for your whole bum bum rush crew
    Who should I do?
    Atack of the bald heads, we comin' through

    Chorus:
    Attack of the bald heads, attack of the bald heads
    Attack of the bald heads, attack of the bald heads
    Attack of the bald heads, attack of the bald heads
    Attack of the bald heads, attack of the bald heads
    Attack of the bald heads, attack of the bald heads

    [Sonee Seeza]
    (I GOT NEWS!) Attack of the bald heads!
    The Onyx; rippin it.. from '93 to the year 2000!
    WORRRRRRRRRRD THE FUCK UP!!

    [Sticky Fingaz]
    Cut ya hair we still never STOP!!!

    (sorry that I took sonsee in one Big DS part)

    "Bacdafucup"

    Studio album by Onyx
    Released March 30, 1993 (US)
    Recorded 1992-1993
    Genre East Coast hip hop, hardcore rap, underground rap
    Length 47:27
    Label Jam Master Jay Records / Rush Associated Labels
    Producer Chyskillz
    Jam Master Jay
    Kool Tee
    Jeff Harris
    Onyx chronology
    Bacdafucup
    (1993) All We Got Iz Us
    (1995)
    Professional ratings
    Review scores
    Source Rating
    Allmusic 4/5 stars[1]
    Robert Christgau C+[2]
    Entertainment Weekly A−[3]
    "Bacdafucup" is the debut album from hardcore rap group Onyx. The album featured their breakout single, "Slam", which received heavy airplay on both radio and television (MTV and BET), leading the song to reach #4 on the Billboard Hot 100. Bacdafucup was certified platinum by the RIAA on October 25, 1993. The album is broken down track-by-track by Onyx in Brian Coleman's book Check the Technique.[4]
    In addition to Slam, two other singles made it to the charts, "Throw Ya Gunz" and "Shiftee". Shiftee was covered by punk-rock group Mindless Self Indulgence.
    In 1998, the album was selected as one of The Source's 100 Best Rap Albums of All Time. Music videos were released for the tracks "Bacdafucup", "Throw Ya Gunz", "Slam", "Shiftee" and "Da Nex Niguz".
    Contents [show]
    Track listing[edit]
    No. Title Producer(s) Length
    1. "Bacdafucup" Chyskillz & Jam Master Jay 0:48
    2. "Bichasniguz" Chyskillz & Jam Master Jay 3:54
    3. "Throw Ya Gunz" Chyskillz 3:16
    4. "Here 'N' Now" Chyskillz 3:40
    5. "Bust Dat Ass" Chyskillz & Jam Master Jay 0:37
    6. "Atak of da Bal-Hedz" Kool Tee 3:12
    7. "Da Mad Face Invasion" Chyskillz & Jam Master Jay 0:46
    8. "Blac Vagina Finda" Chyskillz & Jam Master Jay; Co-Produced by Jeff Harris 3:12
    9. "Da Bounca Nigga" Chyskillz & Jam Master Jay 0:29
    10. "Nigga Bridges" Jam Master Jay & Jeff Harris; Co-Produced by Chyskillz 4:12
    11. "Onyx Is Here" Chyskillz & Jam Master Jay 3:03
    12. "Slam" Chyskillz & Jam Master Jay 3:38
    13. "Stik 'N' Muve" Jam Master Jay & Jeff Harris; Co-Produced by Chyskillz 3:20
    14. "Bichasbootleguz" Chyskillz & Jam Master Jay 0:27
    15. "Shifftee" Chyskillz & Jam Master Jay 4:19
    16. "Phat ('N' All Dat)" Chyskillz 3:17
    17. "Da Nex Niguz" Kool Tee 4:07
    18. "Getdafucout" Chyskillz & Jam Master Jay 1:08
    Samples[edit]
    Bichasniguz
    "Anti Climax" by Lee Morgan
    Throw Ya Gunz
    "Escape-Ism" by James Brown
    "It's a New Day" by Skull Snaps
    "Nautilus" by Bob James
    Bust Dat Ass
    "Ode to Billie Joe" by Lou Donaldson
    Atak of Da Bal-Hedz
    "Blue Juice" by Jimmy McGriff
    Da Mad Face Invasion
    "It's a New Day" by Skull Snaps
    Blac Vagina Finda
    "Nautilus" by Bob James
    Nigga Bridges
    "Synthetic Substitution" by Melvin Bliss
    Slam
    "Rich Kind of Poverty" by Sam & Dave
    "The Champ" by The Mohawks
    Stik 'N' Muve
    "Feel Like Making Love" by Bob James
    Phat ('N' All Dat)
    "Fat Boys" by Fat Boys
    Getdafucout
    "It's a New Day" by Skull Snaps
    "Synthetic Substitution" by Melvin Bliss
    Personnel[edit]
    Onyx - performer, vocals
    Fredro Starr - performer, vocals
    Sticky Fingaz - performer, vocals
    Sonee Seeza - performer, vocals
    Big DS - performer, vocals
    Jam Master Jay - executive producer, producer
    Randy Allen - executive producer,
    Chyskillz - producer
    Jeff Harris - producer
    Jeff Trotter - A&R executive /editing / mastering
    Tony Dawsey - mastering
      • 1
      (deleted) Does boom-bap get any better than this?? Timeless
      • 0 1 vote
      • 0
      Doombot101 Not really, we both love raw shit like this! Ha ha..
      • 0 0 votes
  • Digable Planets - "Time & Space" (3.17)
    "Reachin' (A New Refutation of Time and Space)"

    Studio album by Digable Planets
    Released September 27, 1993
    Recorded 1992-1993
    Genre Hip hop, jazz rap
    Length 56:35
    Label Pendulum/Elektra Records
    Producer Ishmael "Butterfly" Butler
    Shane "The Doctor" Faber
    Mike "Launching An Attack" Mangini
    Digable Planets chronology
    Reachin' (A New Refutation of Time and Space)
    (1993) Blowout Comb
    (1994)
    Professional ratings
    Review scores
    Source Rating
    Allmusic 4.5/5 stars[1]
    Rolling Stone 4/5 stars[2]
    Robert Christgau (A)[3]
    "Reachin (A New Refutation of Time and Space)" is the debut album by alternative hip hop group Digable Planets. It was released on September 27, 1993, by Pendulum/Elektra Records.
    Contents [show]
    Music and lyrics[edit]
    The album was produced by Digable Planets' Butterfly and features raps by each of the group's members.[4] There are no guest performers on Reachin', but the production is heavily sample based. Butterfly samples artists including Kool & the Gang, James Brown and Herbie Hancock to provide the album with funky and jazzy beats. The lyrics tend to cover a wide scope of subject matter including the right to abortion ("La Femme Fetal"), the coolness of Digable Planets ("Rebirth of Slick (Cool Like Dat)") and the similarities between cannabis and funky music ("Nickel Bags").[5]
    Reception[edit]
    The single "Rebirth of Slick (Cool Like Dat)" became a hit in 1993, breaking into the Top 15 on the Billboard Hot 100 chart.[6] It won the Grammy Award for Best Rap Performance by a Duo or Group in 1994. The album was certified Gold by the RIAA in 1993.
    In 1998, this album was listed in the The Source's 100 Best Rap Albums.[7]
    In 2008, "Rebirth of Slick (Cool Like Dat) was ranked number 62 on VH1's 100 Greatest Songs of Hip Hop.[8]
    The song "Rebirth of Slick (Cool Like Dat) was used for a Tide commercial in 2009.
    The album is broken down track-by-track by Digable Planets in Brian Coleman's book Check the Technique.[9]
    Track listing[edit]
    # Title Producer(s) Performer(s) Samples
    1 "It's Good to Be Here" Butterfly, Shane Faber, Mike Mangini Digable Planets
    "Rain Dance" by Herbie Hancock
    "Black Satin" by Miles Davis
    "Samba de Orpheus" by Grant Green
    2 "Pacifics" Butterfly, Shane Faber, Mike Mangini Digable Planets
    "Devika (Goddess)" by Lonnie Liston Smith
    "Take the Country to NY City" by Bohannon
    3 "Where I'm From" Butterfly, Shane Faber, Mike Mangini Digable Planets
    "Tighten Up" by Archie Bell & The Drells
    "Funky Drummer" by James Brown
    "Ain't Nothin' Wrong" by KC & The Sunshine Band
    "Musica Del Alma" by T'n'T Boys
    4 "What Cool Breezes Do" Butterfly, Shane Faber, Mike Mangini Digable Planets
    "Mystique Blues" by The Crusaders
    "Superfluous" by Eddie Harris
    5 "Time & Space (A New Refutation Of)" Butterfly, Shane Faber, Mike Mangini Digable Planets
    "Mambo Bounce" by Sonny Rollins
    6 "Rebirth of Slick (Cool Like Dat)" Butterfly, Shane Faber, Mike Mangini Digable Planets
    "Foodstamps" by 24 Carat Black
    "Blow Your Head" by Fred Wesley and The J.B.'s
    "Impeach the President" by The Honey Drippers
    "Stretchin'" by Art Blakey and The Messengers
    7 "Last of the Spiddyocks" Butterfly, Shane Faber, Mike Mangini Digable Planets
    "Trumpet Solo" by Steven Bernstein
    "String Bass Blues" by Alan Goldsher
    "Impeach The President" by The Honey Drippers
    8 "Jimmi Diggin' Cats" Butterfly, Shane Faber, Mike Mangini Digable Planets
    "Summer Madness" by Kool & The Gang
    9 "La Femme Fetal" Butterfly, Shane Faber, Mike Mangini Digable Planets
    "OD" by Jimi Hendrix, Lightnin' Rod & Buddy Miles
    "Jazzoetry" by The Last Poets
    10 "Escapism (Gettin' Free)" Butterfly, Shane Faber, Mike Mangini Digable Planets
    "Mothership Connection" by Parliament
    "Black Is Chant" by The Last Poets
    "Funky Worm" by The Ohio Players
    "Stretching" by Art Blakey
    "Lilies of the Nile" by The Crusaders
    "Watermelon Man" by Herbie Hancock
    11 "Appointment at the Fat Clinic" Butterfly, Shane Faber, Mike Mangini Digable Planets
    "Blacknuss" by Rahsaan Roland Kirk
    12 "Nickel Bags" Butterfly, Shane Faber, Mike Mangini Digable Planets
    "Give Me Your Love" by Curtis Mayfield
    "Movin' In The Right Direction" by Steve Parks
    "Easin' In" by Edwin Starr
    "Push Push" by Herbie Mann
    13 "Swoon Units" Butterfly, Shane Faber, Mike Mangini Digable Planets
    "Saxophone Interlude" by Earth, Wind & Fire
    "Black Satin Amazon Fire Engine Cry Baby" by Kain
    14 "Examination of What" Butterfly, Shane Faber, Mike Mangini Digable Planets
    "Listen and You'll See" by The Crusaders
    Album singles[edit]
    Single information
    "Rebirth of Slick (Cool Like Dat)"
    Released: November, 1992
    B-side:
    "Where I'm From"
    Released: April, 1993
    B-side:
    "Nickel Bags"
    Released: August 26, 1993
    B-side: "Appointment at the Fat Clinic"
  • De La Soul - "Breakadawn" (Original Video) (4.16)
    "Breakadawn"

    Single by De La Soul
    from the album Buhloone Mindstate
    Released 1993
    Format CD single
    12" single
    Recorded 1993
    Genre Hip hop
    Label Tommy Boy
    Writer(s) P. Huston, K. Mercer, D. Jolicoeur, V. Mason
    Producer(s) Prince Paul, De La Soul
    De La Soul singles chronology
    "Millie Pulled a Pistol on Santa/Keepin' the Faith"
    (1991) "Breakadawn"
    (1993) "Ego Trippin' (Part Two)"
    (1993)
    "Breakadawn" is a 1993 single by hip hop group De La Soul, released from their third album Buhloone Mindstate. The song samples the intro to Michael Jackson's "I Can't Help It" (from his Off the Wall album).
    Track listing[edit]
    "Breakadawn (Vocal Version)" - 4:15
    "Stickabush" - 1:11
    Guest Appearance: Dres of Black Sheep
    "En Focus (Vocal Version)" - 3:15
    Guest Appearance: Dres of Black Sheep
    "The Dawn Brings Smoke" - 2:11
    "Hsubakcits" - 0:15
    Guest Appearance: Dres of Black Sheep
    "En Focus (Instrumental)" - 3:15
    "Breakadawn (Instrumental)" - 4:15

    "Buhloone Mindstate"

    Studio album by De La Soul
    Released September 21, 1993
    Recorded 1992-1993
    Genre Hip hop
    Length 48:14
    Label Tommy Boy/Warner Bros. Records
    01063
    Producer De La Soul, Prince Paul
    De La Soul chronology
    De La Soul Is Dead
    (1991) Buhloone Mindstate
    (1993) Clear Lake Audiotorium (EP)
    (1994)
    Professional ratings
    Review scores
    Source Rating
    Allmusic 3.5/5 stars[1]
    Robert Christgau A[2]
    Entertainment Weekly A+[3]
    RapReviews 10/10 stars[4]
    Rolling Stone (favorable)[5]
    The Rolling Stone Album Guide 4.5/5 stars[6]
    The Source 4.5/5 stars[7]
    Sputnikmusic 4/5 stars[8]
    "Buhloone Mindstate" is De La Soul's third full-length album. It was the last De La Soul album to be produced with Prince Paul. Comedian Chris Rock ranked it 10th in his list of the top 25 hip-hop albums of all time that was published in Rolling Stone in 2005.[9]
    Contents [show]
    Overview[edit]
    Title significance[edit]
    The title refers to the group's efforts to remain grounded after acquiring a name. On the album's intro, the group repeat the phrase, "it might blow up but it won't go pop", then, to end the track, they repeat the line a final time with a balloon popping replacing the word pop. They do the same at the end of "Patti Dooke". These are references to the group's refusal to change their style of music for anyone else, even if it were to become popular.
    Songs and guests[edit]
    De La Soul continued the early 1990s experimentations with jazz by featuring jazz veterans Maceo Parker, Fred Wesley, and Pee Wee Ellis, on "Patti Dooke" and "I Am I Be". The song "Patti Dooke" deals with what the group sees as the mainstream's efforts to control the direction of black music. Posdnous raps:
    I'm known as the farmer
    Cultivatin' mate without mendin'
    Bendin', compromising any of my styles to gain a smile
    Listen while you hear it
    There's no pink in my slip
    I reckon that the rhythm and the blues in the rap got me red
    While the boys from Tommy playing bridge crossin' to a larger community
    Yet they're soon to see I have a brother named Luck
    The Japanese rappers Scha Dara Parr and Takagi Kan make an appearance on "Long Island Wildin'" while Biz Markie drops by on "Stone Age" and Guru makes a spoken cameo on "Patti Dooke" ("...So guard your trenches 'cause we runnin' through 'em. Peace to my man Premier"). Dres of Black Sheep appears, and the album heavily features Shortie No Mass of Philadelphia. The album was preceded by the single and video "Breakadawn", which features samples from Michael Jackson's "I Can't Help it" and Smokey Robinson's "Quiet Storm."
    Track listing[edit]
    No. Title Length
    1. "Intro" 0:52
    2. "Eye Patch" 2:27
    3. "En Focus" (featuring Shortie No Mass and Dres of Black Sheep) 3:15
    4. "Patti Dooke" (featuring Guru, Maceo Parker, Fred Wesley and Pee Wee Ellis) 5:54
    5. "I Be Blowin'" (featuring Maceo Parker) 4:58
    6. "Long Island Wildin'" (featuring Scha Dara Parr and Takagi Kan) 1:30
    7. "Ego Trippin' (Part Two)" 3:52
    8. "Paul's Revenge" 0:43
    9. "3 Days Later" 2:39
    10. "Area" 3:31
    11. "I Am I Be" (featuring Maceo Parker, Fred Wesley and Pee Wee Ellis) 5:03
    12. "In the Woods" (featuring Shortie No Mass) 4:01
    13. "Breakadawn" 4:14
    14. "Dave Has a Problem...Seriously" 0:55
    15. "Stone Age" (featuring Biz Markie) 4:13
    List of samples[edit]
    The following is a list of songs and sound footage sampled in the songs on Buhloone Mindstate.
    Intro
    "Deep Gully" by The Outlaw Blues Band
    Eye Patch
    "Skypager" by A Tribe Called Quest
    "Deep Gully" by The Outlaw Blues Band
    Old, unknown French-education recording (also used on "Transmitting Live from Mars" from De La's debut album)
    En Focus
    "Nothing is The Same" by Grand Funk
    "Intimate Connection" by Kleeer
    "Atomic Dog" by George Clinton
    Patti Dooke
    "People Make the World Go Round" by Milt Jackson
    dialogue excerpts from The Five Heartbeats
    "Rock Box" by Run-D.M.C.
    "Word From Our Sponsors" by Boogie Down Productions
    Long Island Wildin'
    "Ground Hog" by Duke Pearson
    "Rebel Without A Pause" by Public Enemy
    I Be Blowin
    "You've Made Me So Very Happy" by Lou Rawls
    Ego Trippin' [Part Two]
    "Harlem Hendoo" by Al Hirt
    "Ain't No Half Steppin'" by Heatwave
    "(You Gotta) Fight for Your Right (To Party!)" by Beastie Boys
    Paul's Revenge
    "Come In Out Of The Rain" by Parliament
    3 Days Later
    "Love In The Streets" by Johnnie Taylor
    "Hot Dog" by Lou Donaldson
    dialogue excerpts from Deep Cover
    "I'm Afraid The Masquerade Is Over" by David Porter
    Area
    "The New Rap Language" by Spoonie Gee & The Treacherous Three
    "I Call My Baby Pussycat" by Parliament
    "Come Dancing" by Jeff Beck
    "Smokin' Cheeba Cheeba" by Harlem Underground
    "Pee-Wee's Dance" by Joeski Love
    I Am I Be
    "You've Made Me So Very Happy" by Lou Rawls
    "The Next Band" by Eddie Harris
    "Keep Your Fat Mouth Out Of My Business" by Snooky Pryor
    "Miracles" by Jefferson Starship
    In the Woods
    "Track #13" by Maceo Parker
    Breakadawn
    "I Can't Help It" by Michael Jackson
    "Quiet Storm" by Smokey Robinson
    "Song and Dance" by The Bar-Kays
    "Yes We Can Can" by The Pointer Sisters
    Dave Has a Problem...Seriously
    "Something Else Again" by Richie Havens
    Stone Age
    "Lonely Days" by Gregory Isaacs
    "Synthetic Substitution" by Melvin Bliss (drums)
    "A Little Soulful Tune" by Taj Mahal
    "Moondial" by Les DeMerle
    Album singles[edit]
    Single cover Single information
    "Breakadawn"
    Released: 1993
    B-side: En Focus
    "Ego Trippin' (Part Two)"
    Released: 1994
    B-side: "Lovely How I Let My Mind Float"
  • Snoop Dogg - "Pump Pump" Feat. Lil Malik (HD) (2.21)
    "Doggystyle"

    Studio album by Snoop Doggy Dogg
    Released November 23, 1993
    Recorded January – October 1993
    Genre Gangsta rap, g-funk, West Coast hip hop
    Length 53:24
    Label Death Row Records, Interscope Records, Atlantic Records
    Producer Dr. Dre, Suge Knight (exec.)
    Snoop Doggy Dogg chronology
    Doggystyle
    (1993) Tha Doggfather
    (1996)
    Singles from Doggystyle
    "What's My Name?"
    Released: October 30, 1993
    "Gin and Juice"
    Released: January 15, 1994
    "Doggy Dogg World"
    Released: June 26, 1994
    "Doggystyle" is the debut album from American rapper Snoop Dogg, then known as Snoop Doggy Dogg, released by Death Row Records on November 23, 1993. The album was recorded soon following the release of Dr. Dre's landmark debut album The Chronic (1992), to which Snoop Dogg contributed significantly. The style he developed for Dre's album was continued on Doggystyle.[1] Critics have praised Snoop Dogg for the lyrical "realism" he delivers on the album and for his distinctive vocal flow.[1][2]
    Despite some mixed criticism of the album initially upon its release, Doggystyle has earned recognition from many music critics as one of the most significant albums of the 1990s, as well as one of the most important hip hop albums ever released.[3] Much like The Chronic, the distinctive sounds of Doggystyle helped introduce the hip hop style of G-funk to a mainstream audience, bringing forward West Coast hip hop as a dominant force in the early 1990s.[1][4] As of 2008, the Recording Industry Association of America (RIAA) has certified Doggystyle quadruple platinum in sales, and it serves as Snoop Dogg's highest-selling album.
    Doggystyle debuted at number one on the Billboard 200 chart, and sold 802,858 copies in its first week alone, which was the record for a debuting artist and the fastest-selling album ever until Eminem's The Marshall Mathers LP in 2000. Doggystyle is included in The Source magazine's list of the 100 Best Rap Albums, as well as Rolling Stone magazine's list of Essential Recordings of the 90s.[3] About.com placed the album in number 19 of the greatest hip hop/rap albums of all time.
    Background[edit]
    Snoop Dogg came to attention of the music industry in 1992, through his vocal contributions on Dr. Dre's The Chronic. That album is considered to have "transformed the entire sound of West Coast rap" by its development of what later became known as the "G-funk" sound.[4] The Chronic expanded gangsta rap with profanity, anti-authoritarian lyrics and multi-layered samples taken from 1970's P-Funk records.[4] Snoop Dogg contributed vocals to Dre's solo single, "Deep Cover", which led to a high degree of anticipation among hip hop for the release of his own solo album.[2] Snoop was also featured on the single Nuthin' but a "G" Thang, which reached number two on the Billboard Hot 100, giving him mainstream recognition.
    Doggystyle and The Chronic are associated with each other mainly because each prominently featured Snoop Dogg and because both contain G-funk style production from Dr. Dre. The two releases are linked by the high number of vocal contributions from Death Row Records artists, including Tha Dogg Pound, RBX, The Lady of Rage,[6] while both contain a high density of misogynistic lyrics and profanity in their lyrics.[7] In addition, the two albums are each viewed by critics as early "G-funk classics", and have been described as "joined at the hip". 'Doggystyle' also marked the debut of Death Row vocalist, Nanci Fletcher - the daughter of jazz legend Sam Fletcher.[1][7]
    Gangsta rap has been criticized for its extreme lyrics, which are often accused of glamorizing gang violence and black-on-black crime. The Gangsta rappers responded that they were simply describing the realities of life in places such as Compton, California, and Long Beach, California.[8][9] Describing Doggystyle in 1993, Snoop Dogg likewise points to the album's realism, and the extent to which it is based on his personal experience. He said, "I can't rap about something I don't know. You'll never hear me rapping about no bachelor's degree. It's only what I know and that's that street life. It's all everyday life, reality."[10] Explaining his intentions, Snoop Dogg claims he feels he is a role model to many young black men, and that his songs are designed to relate to their concerns. "For little kids growing up in the ghettos," he said, "it's easy to get into the wrong types of things, especially gangbanging and selling drugs. I've seen what that was like, and I don't glorify it, but I don't preach. I bring it to them rather than have them go find out about it for themselves."[10] He further explained the "dream" that he would pursue after making the album: "I'm going to try to eliminate the gang violence. I'll be on a mission for peace. I know I have a lot of power. I know if I say, 'Don't kill', niggas won't kill".
    Track listing[edit]
    No. Title Writer(s) Producer(s) Length
    1. "Bathtub" Calvin Broadus, Jr. Dr. Dre 1:50
    2. "G Funk Intro" (featuring Dr. Dre and The Lady of Rage) Calvin Broadus, Jr., Robin Allen Dr. Dre 2:24
    3. "Gin and Juice" (featuring Dat Nigga Daz and David Ruffin' Jr.) Calvin Broadus, Jr., Andre Young, Harry Wayne Casey, Richard Finch Dr. Dre 3:31
    4. "W Balls" (featuring Nanci Fletcher and Ricky Harris) Calvin Broadus, Jr. Dr. Dre 0:36
    5. "Tha Shiznit" Calvin Broadus, Jr., Andre Young Dr. Dre 4:03
    6. "House Party" Calvin Broadus, Jr. Dr. Dre 0:37
    7. "Lodi Dodi" (featuring Nanci Fletcher) Calvin Broadus, Jr., Douglas Davis, Hachidai Nakamura, Ei Rokusuke, Ricky Walters Dr. Dre 4:24
    8. "Murder Was the Case" (featuring Dat Nigga Daz) Calvin Broadus, Jr., Andre Young, Delmar Arnaud Dr. Dre 3:38
    9. "Serial Killa" (featuring D.O.C., RBX and Tha Dogg Pound) Calvin Broadus, Jr., Andre Young, Delmar Arnaud, Bootsy Collins Dr. Dre 3:35
    10. "Who Am I (What's My Name)?" (featuring Jewell, Dr. Dre and Tony Green) Calvin Broadus, Jr., Andre Young, George Clinton, Garry Shider, David Spradley Dr. Dre 4:06
    11. "For All My Niggaz & Bitches" (featuring Tha Dogg Pound and The Lady of Rage) Calvin Broadus, Jr., Delmar Arnaud, Ricardo Brown, Robin Allen Dr. Dre 4:42
    12. "Ain't No Fun (If the Homies Can't Have None)" (featuring Nate Dogg, Warren G, Nanci Fletcher and Kurupt) Calvin Broadus, Jr., Andre Young, Ricardo Brown, Nathaniel Hale, Warren Griffin Dr. Dre 4:07
    13. "Chronic Break" Calvin Broadus, Jr. Dr. Dre 0:33
    14. "Doggy Dogg World" (featuring Tha Dogg Pound, Nanci Fletcher and The Dramatics) Calvin Broadus, Jr., Delmar Arnaud, Ricardo Brown, Richard "Dimples" Fields Dr. Dre 5:05
    15. "Betta Ask Somebody" Calvin Broadus, Jr. Dr. Dre 0:43
    16. "Gz and Hustlas" (featuring Nanci Fletcher) Calvin Broadus, Jr., Delmar Arnaud, Don Blackman Dr. Dre 3:51
    17. "U Betta Recognize" Calvin Broadus, Jr., Andre Young Dr. Dre 0:56
    18. "Gz Up, Hoes Down" (featuring Hug) Calvin Broadus, Jr., Andre Young, Delmar Arnaud Dr. Dre 2:21
    19. "Pump Pump" (featuring Lil' Malik) Calvin Broadus, Jr., Andre Young, Jamal Phillips, Malik Edwards Dr. Dre 3:42
    Notes[edit]
    "G'z & Hustlas contains uncredited appearances from Lil' Bow Wow.
    "Gz Up, Hoes Down" was omitted on all but the original pressings, due to sample and clearance issues. On the original release's back cover, it is erroneously listed after "Pump Pump" instead of immediately before.
    The original pressings of the album which contain "Gz Up, Hoes Down" list "W Balls" separately on the album's artwork. They also include an erroneous final listing for "Tha Next Episode", a track not included on the album, for a total of a total of sixteen tracks (out of nineteen featured). Later pressings of the album, which remove "Gz Up, Hoes Down", do not list either of these tracks on the album's artwork, although "W Balls" is featured.
    Cut Tracks[edit]
    "Gz Up, Hoez Down" (featuring Hug) - omitted on all but the original pressings, due to sample and clearance issues.
    "Tha Next Episode" (featuring Dr. Dre) - listed on the tracklisting provided to retailers before the album's release, but does not feature on any pressings of the album. The instrumental was later used for Warren G's track "Runnin' Wit No Breaks" from his album, Regulate...G Funk Era[60] The pair later recorded a track entitled "The Next Episode" for Dre's second studio album, 2001, which is completely different from the original.
    "Doggystyle" (featuring Jewell & George Clinton) - recorded during the album sessions, remaining unreleased until its inclusion on the compilation album Death Row: The Lost Sessions Vol. 1[60]
    "The Root of All Evil (Outro)" (featuring Teena Marie) - recorded during the album sessions, remaining unreleased until its inclusion on the compilation album Death Row: The Lost Sessions Vol. 1. The instrumental was later used for the remix of "California Love", by 2Pac featuring Dr. Dre
    "Every Single Day" (featuring Kurupt and Nate Dogg) - recorded during the album sessions, remaining unreleased until an alternate version was released on Tha Dogg Pound compilation album 2002
      • 1
      (deleted) Haha I had this stuck in my head, was going to post it a few days ago :)
      • 0 1 vote
  • Das Efx - "Gimme Dat Micraphone" (3.16)
    Das EFX ‎– "Freakit"
    Label:
    Eastwest Records America ‎– 0-95984
    Format:
    Vinyl, 12"
    Country:
    US
    Released:
    1993
    Genre:
    Hip Hop
    Style:

    Tracklist Hide Credits
    A1 Freakit
    A2 Freakit (Instrumental)
    A3 Freakit (Remix)
    Remix – Chris Charity, Derek Lynch
    B1 Freakit (Remix #2)
    Remix – Chris Charity, Derek Lynch
    B2 Gimme Dat Microphone
    B3 Gimme Dat Microphone (Instrumental)
    Credits
    Engineer – Charlie Marotta
    Producer – Chris Charity, Derek Lynch
    Notes
    Engineers: Charlie Marrotta, Chris Charity & Derek Lynch.

    "Straight Up Sewaside"

    Studio album by Das EFX
    Released November 16, 1993
    Recorded Late 1992-Mid 1993
    North Shore Soundworks
    (Long Island, New York)
    Genre East Coast hip hop, hardcore hip hop
    Length 43:55
    Label EastWest
    Producer Solid Scheme
    Charlie Marotta
    Das EFX
    Das EFX chronology
    Dead Serious
    (1992) Straight Up Sewaside
    (1993) Hold It Down
    (1995)
    Professional ratings
    Review scores
    Source Rating
    Allmusic 4/5 stars[1]
    "Straight Up Sewaside" is the second album by the hip hop duo Das EFX. It was not as popular as their debut album Dead Serious, but was a critical success. It reached #20 on The Billboard 200 despite having three popular singles including "Freakit", "Baknaffek" and "Kaught In Da Ak".
    Contents [show]
    Track listing[edit]
    # Title Songwriters Producer(s) Performer (s) Length
    1 "Intro" *Interlude* 0:38
    2 "Undaground Rappa" A. Weston, W. Hines, C. Charity, D. Lynch, J. Brown Solid Scheme Das Efx 4:01
    3 "Gimme Dat Micraphone" A. Weston, W. Hines, C. Marotta, Kool & The Gang Charlie Marotta Das Efx 3:16
    4 "Check It Out" A. Weston, W. Hines, C. Charity, D. Lynch Solid Scheme Das Efx 3:55
    5 "Interlude" A. Weston, W. Hines, C. Charity, D. Lynch Solid Scheme Das Efx 0:30
    6 "Freakit" A. Weston, W. Hines, C. Charity, D. Lynch Solid Scheme Das Efx 3:18
    7 "Rappaz" A. Weston, W. Hines, C. Charity, D. Lynch, J. Brown Solid Scheme Das Efx 4:22
    8 "Interview" Das Efx 1:29
    9 "Baknaffek" A. Weston, W. Hines, C. Charity, D. Lynch Solid Scheme Das Efx 3:33
    10 "Kaught In Da Ak" A. Weston, W. Hines, C. Charity, D. Lynch, A. Horovitz, D. McDaniels, R. Rubin, R. Simmons Solid Scheme Das Efx 4:51
    11 "Wontu" A. Weston, W. Hines, C. Charity, D. Lynch Solid Scheme Das Efx 2:55
    12 "Krazy Wit Da Books" A. Weston, W. Hines, C. Charity, D. Lynch, H. David, B. Bacharach Solid Scheme Das Efx 3:57
    13 "It'z Lik Dat" A. Weston, W. Hines, C. Charity, D. Lynch Solid Scheme Das Efx 3:30
    14 "Host Wit Da Most [Rappaz Remix]" A. Weston, W. Hines, C. Charity, D. Lynch Das Efx Das Efx 3:32
    Samples[edit]
    "Undaground Rappa"
    "Soul Power" by James Brown
    "The Boss" by James Brown
    "Time 4 Sum Aksion" by Redman
    "Baknaffek"
    "People" by Graham Central Station
    "Buffalo Gals" by Malcolm McLaren
    "Cummin' at Cha" by EPMD
    "Gimme Dat Microphone"
    "Funky Granny" by Kool & The Gang
    "So Wat Cha Sayin'" by EPMD
    "Kaught In Da Ak"
    "Paul Revere" by Beastie Boys
    "It's Like Dat"
    "Just Rhymin' With Biz" by Big Daddy Kane
    "Check It Out"
    "Sing a Simple Song" by Sly & the Family Stone
    "Funky Drummer" by James Brown
    "Here We Go (Live at the Funhouse)" by Run-DMC
    "Freakit"
    "Never Let 'Em Say" by Ballin' Jack
    "Long Red" by Mountain
    "UFO" by ESG
    "The Bridge" by MC Shan
    "Host Wit Da Most (Rappaz Remix)"
    "It's a New Day" by Skull Snaps
    "Superman Lover" by Johnny Guitar Watson
    "Interview"
    "Can't Truss It" by Public Enemy
    "Wontu"
    "I Know You Got Soul" by Eric B. & Rakim
    Album chart positions[edit]
    Year Album Chart positions
    Billboard 200 Top R&B/Hip Hop Albums
    1993 Straight Up Sewaside #20 #6
    Singles chart positions[edit]
    Year Song Chart positions
    Billboard Hot 100 Hot R&B/Hip-Hop Singles & Tracks Hot Rap Singles Hot Dance Music/Maxi-Singles Sales
    1993 "Freakit" #43 #24 #6 #1
    1994 "Baknaffek" - #98 #44 #31
    1994 "Kaught In Da Ak" - - - #32
      • 1
      Wayne "One wrecks, the other destroys!"
      • 0 1 vote
  • A Tribe Called Quest - "Award Tour" (3.27)
    A Tribe Called Quest ‎– "Award Tour"
    Label:
    Jive ‎– 01241-42186-1
    Format:
    Vinyl, 12", 33 ⅓ RPM
    Country:
    US
    Released:
    1993
    Genre:
    Hip Hop
    Style:
    Conscious
    Tracklist Hide Credits
    A1 Award Tour (LP Version)
    Rap [Featuring] – Trugoy The Dove
    3:27
    A2 Award Tour (Radio Version)
    Rap [Featuring] – Trugoy The Dove
    3:27
    B1 Award Tour (Instrumental) 3:27
    B2 The Chase, Part II
    Rap [Featuring] – Consequence (2)
    2:21
    Credits
    Artwork By [Sleeve Design] – ZombArt: JK
    Engineer [Additional] – Tim Latham
    Mastered By – Tom Coyne
    Mixed By, Recorded By – Bob Power
    Photography – Koi Sojer
    Producer – A Tribe Called Quest
    Written-By – A. Muhammad*, J. Davis*, M. Taylor*
    Notes
    "Award Tour," contains a sample of Weldon Irvine's "We Gettin' Down."
    "The Chase, Part II," contains a sample of Steve Arrington's Hall Of Fame's "Beddie Biey," & Biz Markie's "Nobody Beats The Biz."

    "Midnight Marauders"

    Studio album by A Tribe Called Quest
    Released November 9, 1993
    Recorded November 1992–September 1993
    Genre Alternative hip hop, jazz rap
    Length 51:12
    Label Jive, BMG
    Producer A Tribe Called Quest, Large Professor, Skeff Anselm
    A Tribe Called Quest chronology
    The Low End Theory
    (1991) Midnight Marauders
    (1993) Beats, Rhymes and Life
    (1996)
    Singles from Midnight Marauders
    "Award Tour"
    Released: November 1993
    "Electric Relaxation"
    Released: 1994
    "Oh My God"
    Released: May 30, 1994
    Professional ratings
    Review scores
    Source Rating
    Allmusic 5/5 stars[1]
    Chicago Tribune 3/4 stars[2]
    Robert Christgau A−[3]
    Entertainment Weekly A[4]
    NME (7/10)[5]
    Q 4/5 stars[5]
    RapReviews (10/10)[6]
    Rolling Stone 2/5 stars[7]
    The Source 4/5 stars[5]
    USA Today 3/4 stars[8]
    "Midnight Marauders" is the third album by hip hop group A Tribe Called Quest, released November 9, 1993 on Jive Records. It was released two years after A Tribe Called Quest's second album, The Low End Theory, and reached #1 on the R&B/HipHop Charts and #8 on the Billboard 200 in 1993.[9] Midnight Marauders is also seen by many fans and critics as a classic jazz rap album along with The Low End Theory.
    Contents [show]
    Background[edit]
    The album Midnight Marauders was a critical and commercial success, especially the hit single "Award Tour". "Award Tour" was the first single released from the album and it is their highest charting single to date. It peaked at #47 on the Billboard Hot 100 chart, and #1 on the U.S. Hot Rap Singles Chart. The single features Trugoy from De La Soul on the chorus. Subsequent singles released from the album were, in order, "Electric Relaxation" and "Oh My God" which featured a sample of former Leaders of the New School Emcee Busta Rhymes on the chorus. The same sample of Busta Rhymes was also used on the last track of the album "God Lives Through".
    The listener is guided through the program by a robotic voiced woman played by Laurel Dann. As this voice tells the listener at the end of "Award Tour", the meaning of the album's title derives from a figure that "seven times out of ten, we listen to our music at night", hence the "Midnight", and that the word maraud means to loot, and A Tribe Called Quest "maraud your ears".[10] One of the group members, Ali Shaheed Muhammad, described the album's name this way: "We decided to call the album 'Midnight Marauders' because A Tribe Called Quest are like sound thieves looting for your ears."
    With this album, A Tribe Called Quest "shifted their attention to more urban concerns".[11] Rather than simply discussing violence, the group's songs tell stories about everyday events such as a trip to a bodega or a getting a milkshake.[12] However, while they have paid more attention to everyday life, the album is still mattered with typical Hip Hop subjects such as racial issues and sexual tension.
    Midnight Marauders is one of three A Tribe Called Quest albums on The Source's 100 Best Rap Albums.[13] On January 12, 1994 it was certified and it reached platinum status one day less than a year later on January 11, 1995.[14] It is also one of three A Tribe Called Quest albums to be certified platinum by the RIAA.[15]
    Some of the songs have been used in television shows and other media. The song "Electric Relaxation" was used during the opening theme for the WB sitcom Wayans Bros. Of all the videos for this album, "Oh My God" is the only track from the album with a full color music video. The original version of "The Chase Part Two", called "The Chase", uses the same beat, but instead features Consequence without the other members, and can be found as a b-side to "Award Tour". The European Version of the album features the bonus track “Hot Sex” which was featured in the Eddie Murphy film Boomerang in 1992. Later it was released on the bonus disc of the group's fifth studio album The Love Movement in 1998.
    Track listing[edit]
    All songs written by Jonathan Davis, Ali Shaheed Muhammad and Malik Taylor, except where noted. Artists sampled by the group are officially credited as writers for four songs. All songs are credited as produced by A Tribe Called Quest, except "8 Million Stories", produced by Skeff Anselm and "Keep It Rollin'", produced by Large Professor.
    No. Title Writer(s) Length
    1. "Midnight Marauders Tour Guide" 0:45
    2. "Steve Biko (Stir It Up)" 3:11
    3. "Award Tour" (featuring Trugoy the Dove) 3:46
    4. "8 Million Stories" Davis, Muhammad, Taylor, Skeff Anselm 4:30
    5. "Sucka Nigga" Davis, Muhammad, Taylor, Freddie Hubbard 4:05
    6. "Midnight" (featuring Raphael Wiggins) 3:49
    7. "We Can Get Down" 4:19
    8. "Electric Relaxation" 4:04
    9. "Clap Your Hands" Davis, Muhammad, Taylor, Bob James, Leo Nocentelli, George Porter, Jr., Cyril Neville, Joseph Modeliste 3:16
    10. "Oh My God" (featuring Busta Rhymes) 3:29
    11. "Keep It Rollin'" (featuring Large Professor) Davis, Muhammad, Taylor, William Mitchell 3:05
    12. "The Chase, Part II" 4:02
    13. "Lyrics to Go" Davis, Muhammad, Taylor, Steve Arrington, Victor Godsey, Buddy Hankerson 4:09
    14. "God Lives Through" 4:15
    European bonus track
    No. Title Length
    15. "Hot Sex" 2:45
    Additional credits[edit]
    # Title Notes
    1 "Midnight Marauders Tour Guide"
    Songwriters: J. Davis, A. Muhammad, M. Taylor
    Sample: "Aquarius" by Cal Tjader
    2 "Steve Biko (Stir It Up)"
    Songwriters: J. Davis, A. Muhammad, M. Taylor
    Sample: "Ekim" by Michael Urbaniak
    Sample: "Blackstone Legacy" by Woody Shaw
    3 "Award Tour"
    Songwriters: J. Davis, A. Muhammad, M. Taylor
    Sample: "We Gettin' Down" by Weldon Irvine
    Sample: "Lowdown" by Charles Earland
    Sample: "Olinga" by Milt Jackson
    Sample: "Hobo Scratch" by Malcolm McLaren
    4 "8 Million Stories"
    Songwriters: J. Davis, A. Muhammad, M. Taylor, S. Anselm
    Sample: "Bettina" by Bola Sete
    Sample: "Over the Rainbow" by The Ohio Players
    5 "Sucka Nigga"
    Songwriters: J. Davis, A. Muhammad, M. Taylor, Freddie Hubbard
    Sample: "Red Clay" by Jack Wilkins
    Sample: "M.C. Battle" by Busy Bee Starski and Rodney Cee
    6 "Midnight"
    Songwriters: J. Davis, A. Muhammad, M. Taylor
    Sample: "Psychedelic Shack" by Albino Gorilla
    Sample: "North Beach" by George Duke
    7 "We Can Get Down"
    Songwriters: J. Davis, A. Muhammad, M. Taylor
    Sample: "Martin's Funeral" by Bill Cosby
    Sample: "The Big Beat" by Billy Squier
    Sample: "My Melody" by Eric B. and Rakim
    8 "Electric Relaxation"
    Songwriters: J. Davis, A. Muhammad, M. Taylor
    Sample: "Mystic Brew" by Ronnie Foster
    Sample: "Outside Love" by Brethren
    Sample: "Dreams" by Ramsey Lewis
    9 "Clap Your Hands"
    Songwriters: J. Davis, A. Muhammad, M. Taylor, B. James, L. Nocentelli, G. Porter, C. Neville, J. Modeliste
    Sample: "Nautilus" by Bob James
    Sample: "Hand Clapping Song" by The Meters
    Sample: "Ode to Billy Joe" by Lou Donaldson
    10 "Oh My God"
    Songwriters: J. Davis, A. Muhammad, M. Taylor
    Sample: "Who's Gonna Take Weight" by Kool & The Gang
    Sample: "Why Can't People Be Colors Too?" by The Whatnauts
    Sample: "Absolutions" by Lee Morgan
    11 "Keep It Rollin'"
    Songwriters: J. Davis, A. Muhammad, M. Taylor, W. Mitchell
    Sample: "Feel Like Making Love" by Roy Ayers
    12 "The Chase, Part II"
    Songwriters: J. Davis, A. Muhammad, M. Taylor, Steve Arrington, Victor Godsey, Buddy Hankerson
    Sample: "Beddie Biey" by Steve Arrington
    Sample: "Nobody Beats the Biz" by Biz Markie
    13 "Lyrics to Go"
    Songwriters: J. Davis, A. Muhammad, M. Taylor
    Sample: "Just Enough Room for Storage" by James Brown
    Sample: "Inside My Love" by Minnie Ripperton
    Sample: "Mixed Up Cup" by Clyde McPhatter
    14 "God Lives Through"
    Songwriters: J. Davis, A. Muhammad, M. Taylor
    Sample: "Dig On It" by Jimmy McGriff
    Sample: "On Love" by David T. Walker
    Sample: "Oh My God" by A Tribe Called Quest
    * "Hot Sex"
    Songwriters: J. Davis, A. Muhammad, M. Taylor
    Sample: "Who's Making Love" by Lou Donaldson
    Accolades[edit]
    The information is taken from Acclaimedmusic.net[16] and other website links below.
    Publication Country Accolade Year Rank
    Ego Trip USA Hip Hop's 25 Greatest Albums by Year 1980-98 1999 #2
    Exclaim! Canada 100 Records that Rocked 100 Issues 2000 *
    Pitchfork Media USA Top 100 Albums of the 1990s [redux] 2003 #75
    The Source USA The Source 100 Best Hip-Hop Albums of All Time 1998 *
    The Guardian UK 100 Albums that Don't Appear in All Other Top 100 Album Lists 1999 #98
    The New Nation UK Top 100 Albums by Black Artists #11
    OOR Moordlijst Netherlands 10 The 100 Best Albums of 1991-1995 1995 #31
    Spex Germany 1001 The 100 Albums of the Century 1999 #19
    ( * ) designates lists which are unordered

    The back vinyl cover of Midnight Marauders
    Widely respected and admired for their success and artistry throughout the hip hop scene, and preternaturally inclined to accept this adulation with grace and humility, the group elected to summon fellow hip hoppers whose work as artists and actions as human beings they respected, and photographed headshots of each for arrangement on the album's cover and liner-notes insert. And like The Beatles' Sgt. Pepper's Lonely Hearts Club Band, it serves as a time capsule of the era: a who's who of hip hop circa 1993.
    According to ego trip's Book of Rap Lists, there are a reported 71 different hip hop luminaries and radio DJ's who adorned Midnight Marauders. The cover was issued in three different color schemes- red, black, and green (with black being the rarest). The book goes into detail as to which artists were on which particular album cover using a number scheme to easily identify each artist. The complete list of artists is as follows:
    Afrika Bambaataa
    AMG
    Ant Banks
    Awesome Two
    Beastie Boys (Mike D, Adrock, MCA)
    Black Moon
    Busta Rhymes
    Casual
    Chi Ali
    Chuck D
    The Cold Crush Brothers (Almighty KG, Charlie Chase, Easy AD, Grandmaster Caz, DJ Tony Tone)
    Daddy-O (of Stetsasonic)
    Dallas Austin
    Del Tha Funkee Homosapien
    Diamond D
    Doug E. Fresh
    De La Soul (Posdnuos, Dave & Mase)
    DJ Jazzy Joyce
    Kool DJ Red Alert
    DJ Ron G
    DJ Silver D
    DJ Teddy Ted
    Dr. Dre
    Grandmaster Flash
    Heavy D
    Ice-T
    Jazzy Jay
    Jungle Brothers (Afrika Baby Bam, Mike G)
    DJ Kid Capri
    Kool Moe Dee
    Large Professor
    Lords of the Underground
    MC Lyte
    MC Serch
    Neek the Exotic
    Organized Konfusion
    The Pharcyde (Fat Lip, Imani, Romye, Slim Kid Tre')
    Pete Nice
    Rashad Smith
    Rock Steady Crew (Crazy Legs, Mr. Wiggles, Pee Wee Dance, Ruel)
    Sean Combs
    Skeff Anselm
    Souls of Mischief
    Special Ed
    Sweet Tee
    Too Short
    Whodini (Grandmaster Dee)
    Zulu Nation Supreme Council (Zulu King Muhammad, Unknown)
    The album artwork of Midnight Marauders was the source of inspiration for a collection of products released by the Air Jordan Brand that includes t-shirts and sneakers and was released February 2009. The sneakers, officially called Air Jordan I Retro High Strap, were often called Midnight Marauders Air Jordan I or A Tribe Called Quest Air Jordan I by customers and featured a design of red, green and black. Two of the t-shirt designs include a wing design and a design mimicking the album cover of Midnight Marauders.
    It also served as inspiration for a t-shirt by Munich-based clothing company Beastin', showing the members of the original 1992 Dream Team, as well as for other works of album artwork (such as the Talking Heads' 2004 compilation album The Best of Talking Heads).[17]
    See also[edit]
    List of number-one albums of 1993 (U.S.)
  • Wu-Tang Clan - "Wu-Tang: 7th Chamber" (Part 1) (with lyrics) (6.07)
    "Enter the Wu-Tang (36 Chambers)" is the debut album of American hip hop group Wu-Tang Clan, released November 9, 1993, on Loud Records and distributed through RCA Records. Recording sessions for the album took place during 1992 to 1993 at Firehouse Studio in New York City, and it was mastered at The Hit Factory. The album's title originates from the martial arts film The 36th Chamber of Shaolin (1978). The group's de facto leader RZA, also known as Prince Rakeem, produced the album entirely, utilizing heavy, eerie beats and a sound largely based on martial-arts movie clips and soul music samples.

    The distinctive sound of "Enter the Wu-Tang (36 Chambers)" created a blueprint for hardcore hip hop during the 1990s and helped return New York City hip hop to national prominence. Its sound also became hugely influential in modern hip hop production, while the group members' explicit, humorous, and free-associative lyrics have served as a template for many subsequent hip hop records. Serving as a landmark record in the era of hip hop known as the East Coast Renaissance, its influence helped lead the way for several other East Coast hip hop artists, including Nas, The Notorious B.I.G., Mobb Deep, and Jay-Z.

    Despite its raw, underground sound, the album had surprising chart success, peaking at number 41 on the US Billboard 200 chart. By 1995, it was certified platinum by the Recording Industry Association of America, and has sold over 2 million copies in the United States.[1] Initially receiving positive reviews from most music critics, Enter the Wu-Tang (36 Chambers) is regarded by some music writers as one of the most significant albums of the 1990s, as well as one of the greatest hip hop albums ever. In 2003, the album was ranked number 386 on Rolling Stone magazine's list of the 500 greatest albums of all time.

    Background and recording[edit]
    In the late 1980s, cousins Robert Diggs, Gary Grice, and Russell Jones formed a group named Force of the Imperial Master, also known as the All in Together Now Crew.[2] Each member recorded under an alias: Grice as The Genius, Diggs as Prince Rakeem or The Scientist, and Jones as The Specialist. The group never signed to a major label, but caught the attention of the New York rap scene and was recognized by rapper Biz Markie.[3] By 1991, The Genius and Prince Rakeem were signed to separate record labels. The Genius released Words from the Genius (1991) on Cold Chillin' Records and Prince Rakeem released Ooh I Love You Rakeem (1991) on Tommy Boy Records. Both were soon dropped by their labels. Embittered but unbowed, they took on new monikers (The Genius became GZA while Prince Rakeem became RZA) and refocused their efforts. RZA discussed the matter in their release The Wu-Tang Manual (2005), stating "[Tommy Boy] made the decision to sign House of Pain over us. When they dropped me, I was thinking, 'Damn, they chose a bunch of whiteboy shit over me.'"[4]

    RZA began collaborating with Dennis Coles, better known as Ghostface Killah, another rapper from the Stapleton Projects apartment complex in Staten Island. The duo decided to create a hip hop group whose ethos would be a blend of "Eastern philosophy picked up from kung fu movies, watered-down Nation of Islam preaching picked up on the New York streets, and comic books."[4]

    "Enter the Wu-Tang (36 Chambers)" was recorded at Firehouse Studio in New York City from 1992 to 1993. The album was produced, mixed, arranged, and programmed by RZA, and was mastered at The Hit Factory in New York City by Chris Gehringer.[5] Because of an extremely limited budget, the group was only able to record in a small, inexpensive studio; with up to eight of the nine Wu-Tang members in the studio at once, the quarters were frequently crowded.[2] To decide who appeared on each song, RZA forced the Wu-Tang rappers to battle with each other. This competition led to the track "Meth Vs. Chef", a battle between Method Man and Raekwon over the rights to rap over RZA's beat; this track was left off the Wu-Tang Clan's debut album but surfaced on Method Man's debut, Tical (1994).

    "Enter the Wu-Tang (36 Chambers)"

    Studio album by Wu-Tang Clan
    Released November 9, 1993
    Recorded 1992–1993 at Firehouse Studio, New York City, New York, United States
    Genre Hip hop
    Length 61:31
    Label Loud
    Producer RZA (also exec.), Method Man, Ol' Dirty Bastard, Ghostface Killah (exec.)
    Wu-Tang Clan chronology
    Enter the Wu-Tang (36 Chambers)
    (1993) Wu-Tang Forever
    (1997)
    Wu-Tang Clan solo chronology
    Prince Rakeem: Ooh I Love You Rakeem
    (1991) Enter the Wu-Tang (36 Chambers)
    (1993) Method Man: Tical
    (1994)
    Singles from Enter the Wu-Tang (36 Chambers)
    "Protect Ya Neck"
    Released: May 3, 1993
    "Method Man"
    Released: August 3, 1993
    "C.R.E.A.M."
    Released: January 31, 1994
    "Can It Be All So Simple"
    Released: 1994

    Track listing[edit]
    CD/cassette[edit]
    Tracks 1–5 are on the Shaolin Sword side of the album and tracks 6–12 are on the Wu-Tang Sword side. The international version contains an additional track on the latter (Conclusion).
    # Title Time Producer(s) Performer(s) Samples
    1 "Bring da Ruckus" 4:10 RZA
    Chorus: RZA
    First verse: Ghostface Killah
    Second verse: Raekwon
    Third verse: Inspectah Deck
    Fourth verse: GZA
    "Synthetic Substitution" as performed by Melvin Bliss
    Dialogue from the motion picture Shaolin & Wu Tang
    Dialogue from the motion picture Ten Tigers from Kwangtung
    2 "Shame on a Nigga" 2:57 RZA
    Intro: Raekwon
    Chorus & first verse: Ol' Dirty Bastard
    Second verse: Method Man
    Third verse: Raekwon
    Fourth verse: Ol' Dirty Bastard
    "Different Strokes" as performed by Syl Johnson; written by Johnny Cameron and John Zachary
    "Black and Tan Fantasy" as performed by Thelonious Monk; written by Duke Ellington and Bubber Miley
    3 "Clan in da Front" 4:33 RZA
    Intro: RZA
    Chorus/verses: GZA
    "Synthetic Substitution" as performed by Melvin Bliss
    "Honey Bee" as performed by New Birth, written by Anne Bogan, Doug Edwards, Harvey Fuqua and Dennis Walker
    "The Love You Save" as performed by The Jackson 5
    "Ba-Lue Bolivar Ba-Lues-Are" as performed by Thelonious Monk
    4 "Wu-Tang: 7th Chamber" 6:05 RZA
    Intro skit: Raekwon, Method Man, Ghostface Killah, U-God, Inspectah Deck
    First verse: Raekwon
    Second verse: Method Man
    Third verse: Inspectah Deck
    Fourth verse: Ghostface Killah
    Fifth verse: RZA
    Sixth verse: Ol' Dirty Bastard
    Seventh verse: GZA
    "Spinning Wheel" as performed by Dr. Lonnie Smith
    5 "Can It Be All So Simple" 6:53 RZA
    Intro: RZA & Raekwon
    Chorus: Raekwon & Ghostface Killah
    First verse: Raekwon
    Second verse: Ghostface Killah
    "The Way We Were" as performed by Gladys Knight & the Pips; written by Marilyn Bergman, Alan Bergman and Marvin Hamlisch
    "I Got The" as performed by Labi Siffre; written by Labi Siffre
    6 "Da Mystery of Chessboxin'" 4:48 RZA
    (Co-produced by Ol' Dirty Bastard)
    Chorus: Method Man
    First verse: U-God
    Second verse: Inspectah Deck
    Third verse: Raekwon
    Fourth verse: Ol' Dirty Bastard
    Fifth verse: Ghostface Killah
    Sixth verse: Masta Killa
    "Tramp" as performed by Otis Redding and Carla Thomas
    Dialogue from the motion picture Shaolin & Wu Tang
    Dialogue from the motion picture Five Deadly Venoms
    7 "Wu-Tang Clan Ain't Nuthing ta Fuck Wit" 3:36 RZA
    (Co-produced by Method Man)
    Intro/chorus/first verse/outro: RZA
    Second verse: Inspectah Deck
    Third verse: Method Man
    "Check the Rhime" by A Tribe Called Quest
    "Impeach the President" as performed by The Honey Drippers; written by Roy C. Hammond
    "Hihache" as performed by Lafayette Afro Rock Band; written by Leroy Gomes
    "Underdog Theme" as written by W. Watts Biggers
    Dialogue from the film Shaolin Executioner
    8 "C.R.E.A.M." 4:12 RZA
    Intro: Method Man & Raekwon
    Chorus: Method Man
    First verse: Raekwon
    Second verse: Inspectah Deck
    Outro: RZA & Ghostface Killah
    "As Long as I've Got You" as performed by The Charmels; written by Isaac Hayes and David Porter
    9 "Method Man" 5:50 RZA
    Pre-song dialogue: Method Man & Raekwon
    Intro: GZA
    Chorus/verses: Method Man
    Outro: RZA & Ghostface Killah
    "Synthetic Substitution" as performed by Melvin Bliss
    "Sport" as performed by Lightnin' Rod; written by Kool & The Gang and Lightnin' Rod
    "More Bounce to the Ounce" as performed by Zapp; written by Roger Troutman
    "Method of Modern Love" as performed by Hall & Oates; written by Janna Allen and Daryl Hall
    "Sundown" as performed by Gordon Lightfoot
    Interpolated TV commercial "How Many Licks?"
    10 "Protect Ya Neck" 4:52 RZA
    Intro: RZA and Method Man
    First verse: Inspectah Deck
    Second verse: Raekwon
    Third verse: Method Man
    Bridge: U-God
    Interlude: Method Man, Ol' Dirty Bastard and RZA
    Fourth verse: Ol' Dirty Bastard
    Fifth verse: Ghostface Killah
    Sixth verse: RZA
    Seventh verse: GZA
    Outro: RZA, Method Man
    "Tramp" as performed by Lowell Fulson
    "The Grunt" as performed by The J.B.'s
    "Sing a Simple Song" as performed by Sly & the Family Stone
    "Cold Feet" as performed by Albert King
    11 "Tearz" 4:17 RZA
    Intro/first verse: RZA
    Second verse: Ghostface Killah
    "After Laughter (Comes Tears)" as performed by Wendy Rene; written by Marianne Brittenum, Johnny Frierson, Mary Frierson and Jackson
    12 "Wu-Tang: 7th Chamber—Part II" 6:09 RZA
    Identical to original
    "Clan in da Front" as performed by the Wu-Tang Clan
    13* "Method Man" (Skunk Mix) 3:12 RZA
    Chorus/verses: Method Man
    "Disco Lady" as performed by Johnnie Taylor
    "I'm Just a Bill" as performed by Jack Sheldon from interstitial program show Schoolhouse Rock!
    Interpolated traditional folk song "Going to Kentucky"
    An asterisk (*) indicates international version bonus track

    The information on music that is sampled is extracted from the-breaks.com and WhoSampled.com[51][52]

    Vinyl LP[edit]
    The vinyl LP has a different track order than that of the CD and cassette:

    [hide]Shaolin Sword (Side 1)
    No. Title Length
    1. "Bring Da Ruckus"
    2. "Shame On A Nigga"
    3. "Clan In Da Front"
    4. "Wu-Tang: 7th Chamber"
    5. "Can It Be All So Simple"
    6. "Protect Ya Neck (Intermission)"
    [hide]Wu-Tang Sword (Side 2)
    No. Title Length
    1. "Da Mystery of Chessboxin'"
    2. "Wu-Tang Clan Ain't Nuthing Ta F' Wit"
    3. "C.R.E.A.M."
    4. "Method Man"
    5. "Tearz"
    6. "Wu-Tang: 7th Chamber – Part II"
    7. "Conclusion"
    Personnel[edit]
    Credits for Enter the Wu-Tang (36 Chambers) adapted from Allmusic.[53]

    Musicians[edit]
    Inspectah Deck – vocals, lyrics
    4th Disciple – scratching
    Ghostface Killah – executive producer, vocals, lyrics
    GZA/Genius – vocals, lyrics
    Masta Killa – vocals, lyrics
    Method Man – vocals, producer, lyrics
    Ol' Dirty Bastard – vocals, producer, lyrics
    RZA/Prince Rakeem – arranger, executive producer, mixing, producer, programming, vocals, lyrics
    Raekwon – vocals, lyrics
    U-God – vocals, lyrics
    Additional personnel[edit]
    Carlos Bess – engineer
    Richard Bravo – set design, design
    Mitchell Diggs – executive producer, supervisor, production supervisor
    Chris Gehringer – mastering
    John Gibbons – supervisor, production supervisor
    Oli Grant – executive producer, supervisor, production supervisor
    Daniel Hastings – photography
    Michael McDonald – supervisor, production supervisor
    Jacqueline Murphy – artwork, art direction
    Ethan Ryman – engineer
    Mike Theodore – supervisor, production supervisor
    Tracey Waples – executive producer
    Amy Wenzler – design
  • Brand Nubian - "Love Me Or Leave Me Alone" (3.49)
    Brand Nubian ‎– "Love Me Or Leave Me Alone"
    Label:
    Elektra ‎– 0-66337
    Format:
    Vinyl, 12", 33 ⅓ RPM
    Country:
    US
    Released:
    1993
    Genre:
    Hip Hop
    Style:

    Tracklist Hide Credits
    A1 Love Me Or Leave Me Alone (Clean Version) 5:31
    A2 Love Me Or Leave Me Alone (Remix)
    Remix – Brand Nubian
    4:26
    B1 The Travel Jam (LP Version) 3:52
    B2 The Travel Jam (Instrumental Version) 3:50
    Credits
    Producer – Brand Nubian

    "In God We Trust"

    Studio album by Brand Nubian
    Released February 2, 1993
    Genre Hip Hop
    Length 55:32
    Label Elektra
    Producer Rafael, Sting International, Diamond D
    Brand Nubian chronology
    One for All
    (1990) In God We Trust
    (1993) Everything is Everything
    (1994)
    Professional ratings
    Review scores
    Source Rating
    Allmusic 4/5 stars[1]
    Robert Christgau (dud)[2]
    Rolling Stone Album Guide 3/5 stars[3]
    "In God We Trust" is the second album from hip hop group Brand Nubian. Lead MC Grand Puba left the group to pursue a solo career in 1991, following the release of their revered debut One for All. DJ Alamo also left to work with Puba, leaving MC's Sadat X and Lord Jamar, who enlisted DJ Sincere to join the group. The album was less successful than the group's debut but still received strong reviews. The single "Punks Jump up to Get Beat Down" became a Billboard Hot 100 hit, but was met with controversy over allegedly homophobic content, referencing the Sadat X line "Though I can freak, fly, flow, fuck up a faggot/I don't understand their ways, I ain't down with gays." The single "Love Me or Leave Me Alone" was also a Hot-100 hit. Lyrically, the album contains extremely militant content that reflects the group's identity as Five Percenters, adhering to the philosophy of the Nation of Gods and Earths.

    Contents [show]
    Track listing[edit]
    # Title Producer(s) Performer (s)
    1 "Allah U Akbar" Brand Nubian Sadat X, Lord Jamar
    2 "Ain't No Mystery" Brand Nubian Lord Jamar, Sadat X
    3 "Meaning of the 5%" Brand Nubian *Interlude*
    4 "Pass the Gat" Brand Nubian Sadat X, Lord Jamar
    5 "Black Star Line" Brand Nubian,
    Rafael,
    Sting International Sadat X, Lord Jamar, Red Fox
    6 "Allah & Justice" Brand Nubian Lord Jamar, DJ Sincere, Sadat X
    7 "The Godz..." Brand Nubian Lord Jamar, Sadat X
    8 "The Travel Jam" Brand Nubian Lord Jamar, Sadat X
    9 "Brand Nubian Rock the Set" Brand Nubian Sadat X, Lord Jamar
    10 "Love Me or Leave Me Alone" Brand Nubian Sadat X, Lord Jamar
    11 "Steal Ya Ho" Brand Nubian Lord Jamar, Sadat X
    12 "Steady Bootleggin’'" Brand Nubian Sadat X, Lord Jamar
    13 "Black & Blue" Brand Nubian Sadat X, Lord Jamar
    14 "Punks Jump up to Get Beat Down" Diamond D Sadat X, Lord Jamar
    Samples
    "Allah U Akbar"
    "Funky President" by James Brown
    "Ain't No Mystery"
    "Something You Got" by Wilson Pickett
    "Allah and Justice"
    "Look at Granny Run" by Howard Tate
    "Love Me or Leave Me Alone"
    "San Francisco Lights" by Bobbi Humphrey
    "Sing a Simple Song" by Booker T. & the M.G.'s
    "Meaning of the 5%"
    "T Stands for Trouble" by Marvin Gaye
    "Pass The Gat"
    "Superfluous" by Eddie Harris
    "Steady Bootleggin"
    "People Sure Act Funny" by Lonnie Smith
    "Bootleggin' by Simtec & Wylie
    "The Godz..."
    "Amen, Brother" by The Winstons
    "Punks Jump Up to Get Beat Down"
    "Gonna Fly Now" by Bill Conti
    "It's Your Thing" by Lou Donaldson
    "Black and Blue"
    "American Tango" by Weather Report
    "The Travel Jam"
    "I Can't Get Next to You" by The Temptations
    "Shape Your Mind to Die" by Leon Thomas
    "Superrappin' by Grandmaster Flash & The Furious Five
    "All for One" by Brand Nubian
    "To the Right" by Brand Nubian
    "Steal Ya 'Ho"
    "Ode to Billie Joe" by Lou Donaldson
    "The New Dance Craze" by The Five Stairsteps
    "Girls - Part 2" by The B-Boys
    "Flex" by Mad Cobra
    "Brand Nubian Rock the Set"
    "I Don't Know This World Is Coming To" by Wattstax
    "Theme from Rocky" by Bill Conti (horn solo heard in the song)
    "You'll Never Get to Heaven (If You Break My Heart)" by Cal Tjader